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Title: The syntax and prosody of contact Spanish: Focalization, Topicalization, and Clitic Left Dislocation

  1. Major Contributors: Liliana Sánchez (Rutgers, New Brunswick), Jacqueline Toribio (University of Texas, Austin), Aaron Roggia (Penn State University), Ana de Prada (Penn State University)
  2. Lab (s) Name (s): Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition Group
  3. URL: https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/site/cba0b8dc-c8d5-4163-80ab-78c94dce7e06
  4. Coverage (countries): USA, Peru
  5. Languages: Spanish, English
  6. Date: 2008-2010
  1. GENERAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION
    The present study examines the word order and intonation preferences manifested in the interpretations and productions of Spanish heritage speakers who have experienced extended contact with English in the United States.
  2. PURPOSES OF THE PROJECT
    The study contemplates the differential effects of enduring language contact on the interfaces of the computational system with the internal and external components. In particular, our research analyzes the syntactic form and prosodic properties that characterize focused and non-focused generic- and specific-DP fronting in the oral productions of fourteen Peruvian heritage speakers of Spanish who have experienced extended contact with English in the United States.
  3. LEADING QUESTIONS
    Does language contact affect syntactic structures only or does it affect intonational contours too?
  4. RATIONALE AND AGENDA
    Data collection 2008
  5. PARTICULAR STUDIES
  6. CURRENT STATUS OF PROJECT
    Data collection completed.
  7. PEOPLE
  8. CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS
    (2008) Preposed or stressed? The word order and intonation of object focus in contact Spanish. 38th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. April 4-6, with Jacqueline Toribio and Aaron Roggia
  9. PAPERS/BOOKS PUBLISHED
  10. PAPERS IN PREP
    L. Sánchez, J. Toribio, Roggia, A. and A. De Prada, “The syntax and prosody of contact Spanish: Focalization, Topicalization, and Clitic Left Dislocation.”